Frederick Douglass, American slave owners of the mid-nineteenth century frequently resorted to brutality and violence Custom Paper

As his autobiography makes clear, in their efforts to extract labor and obedience from individuals like Frederick Douglass, American slave owners of the mid-nineteenth century frequently resorted to brutality and violence. Indeed, as Douglass has it, slavery’s ultimate aim was nothing less than the complete dehumanization of the slave. Based on your reading of Douglass’ Narrative, to what extent would you say slaveowners’ succeeded in this endeavor? Does Douglass’ autobiography read simply as a tale of unremitting woe, of black men and women transformed into “brutes” on account of their status as human property? Or does the world this “American slave” describes suggest that slavery failed to completely accomplish its goals? And in a more general sense, what does the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass say about how we should understand slavery in antebellum America?

Instructions: After reading the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, compose a 3-5 page essay (double-spaced, 1-inch margins, 12pt. Times New Roman font) that addresses the following question. In order to be eligible for full credit, your essay must present and develop an argument based on evidence drawn from Douglass’ autobiography, must follow proper citation procedures, and must be submitted both electronically (via Turnitin).

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